Activists blast Mexico’s immigration law

The Mexican president has been here in the US criticizing the Arizona immigration law (which basically does what the unenforced federal law is supposed to do), yet finally someone is pointing out that Mexican immigration law is pretty similar to the Arizona law, and is abused in many ways. Maybe President Calderon should rethink Mexico’s laws first, before telling us what to do here.

From USAToday:

TULTITLN, Mexico — Arizona’s new law forcing local police to take a greater role in enforcing immigration law has caused a lot of criticism from Mexico, the largest single source of illegal immigrants in the United States.But in Mexico, illegal immigrants receive terrible treatment from corrupt Mexican authorities, say people involved in the system.

 And Mexico has a law that is no different from Arizona’s that empowers local police to check the immigration documents of people suspected of not being in the country legally.

 “There (in the United States), they’ll deport you,” Hector Vázquez, an illegal immigrant from Honduras, said as he rested in a makeshift camp with other migrants under a highway bridge in Tultitlán. “In Mexico they’ll probably let you go, but they’ll beat you up and steal everything you’ve got first.”

 Mexican authorities have harshly criticized Arizona’s SB1070, a law that requires local police to check the status of persons suspected of being illegal immigrants. The law provides that a check be done in connection with another law enforcement event, such as a traffic stop, and also permits Arizona citizens to file lawsuits against local authorities for not fully enforcing immigration laws.

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Former Mexican foreign minister calls for ‘North American union’, unified currency

From Raw Story:

Prolific Mexican politician and intellectual Jorge Castañeda believes that a greater North American community — a “North American Union” — with economies tied together under a European Union-style system, complete with open borders and a unified currency, is the wave of the future.

In a new interview with Web site BigThink.com, Castañeda, Mexico’s foreign minister from 2000-2003 and a global distinguished professor of politics at New York University, said that with nearly 11 percent of Mexicans living in the United States, he has stopped seeing his nation as a Latin American country.

“Well, my sense is that we’re moving closer and closer to forms of economic integration with the United States and Canada and conceivably Central America and Caribbean could become part of that in the coming years,” he said. “I don’t see Mexico as a Latin American country. Too much of trade, investment, tourism, immigration, remittances, absolutely everything is concentrated exclusively with the United States. So, Mexico has to be part of a North American community, a North American union, which at some point probably should include some type of monetary union along European lines with a free flow of labor, with energy being on the table, etc.”

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Mexican mayor announces rival’s death hours before body is found

From The Telegraph (U.K.):

Mauricio Fernandez was being sworn in again as mayor of San Pedro Garza Garcia, one of northern Mexico’s most exclusive communities, when he announced to his cheering supporters: “Black Saldana, who apparently is the one who was asking for my head, was found dead today in Mexico City.”

However, speculation that Mr Fernandez might have had something to do with the death of Hector Saldana arose when it emerged that the barefoot, blindfolded corpse of “Black Saldana” had not been found until three and a half hours after the mayor’s speech, according to Mexico City prosecutors. The body – which was found hundreds of miles away – was not identified until two days later.

Now, the mayor is facing questions about the killing.

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Uruguay, Mexico disavow de facto Honduran gov’t

From Xinhuanet.com:

MONTEVIDEO, Aug. 14 (Xinhua) — Uruguayan President Tabare Vazquez and his Mexican counterpart Felipe Calderon disavowed the de facto Honduran government in a joint declaration Friday.

During their meeting in Montevideo, the two presidents issued a declaration stating that the Honduran “constitutional government is led by President Manuel Zelaya.” The declaration also expressed their refusal to recognize any government that resulted from the disruption of constitutional order.

Zelaya was ousted by the Honduran army on June 28 and flown out of the country.

On a two-day visit to Uruguay, Calderon joined Vazquez in his support for the San Jose Agreement, an initiative proposed by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias, who is acting as a mediator in the Honduran conflict. Calderon and Vazquez called the agreement an important proposal to find a peaceful and negotiated solution to the crisis.

Read the rest:

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-08/15/content_11885563.htm

Mexican immigration to US hits 10-year low: study

With the economy the way it is, there’s really no reason to go through the hassle of coming here.

From Raw Story:

http://rawstory.com/news/afp/Mexican_immigration_to_US_hits_10_y_07222009.html